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Mistakes that could Doom your IT Career – Part 1

As you sail across the office floor, you probably don’t see them, but there are virtual banana peels everywhere. If you’re going too fast, if you’re holding your head too high, if you’re losing sight of the ground, you’re going to slip. IT careers are undergoing a major transformation; they are no longer easy. Business technology’s speed of evolution is simply mind-numbing. Managing an IT career is, therefore, a task requiring diligence, investment, and care. Besides that, you also need to watch out for some of the lesser-known errors that might slow your IT career growth seriously. This guide is our endeavour to help you avoid these errors. 

Running away from negative experiences

“Running away” is a vague expression; think of it as putting it in your resignation papers because the present situation is bad, not because there is something much better in your hand. In the tech industry, the idea of switching jobs quickly is not a taboo. Often, when you stay in an organization, your salary will stagnate, and you’ll need a change of job to get better pay. However, your inclination to run away from the realities of your current job must not be the core motivation to do so. Some of these are the following:

  • Lack of appreciation from peers and supervisors
  • Absence of clarity in terms of career progressions
  • Lack of sponsored training in new technologies

Ideally, you should be able to solve these problems by asking the right people the right questions, because in subsequent jobs you can expect to face them again. At the very least, by living through them, you must take lessons from these experiences, rather than simply avoiding them.

Being Offline

Whether you like it or not, you need to be visible on the web to be relevant across industries and geographies for the most exciting tech jobs. Although the narrative of “quick social media” has its merits, it is too great a risk for a tech employee to miss out on the online connections. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn— all these platforms have become like open cafes to connect techpreneurs. Over the long term, maintaining a strong online presence will pay rich dividends. Here are a few actions that you can start with:

  • Create separate professional profiles for social media
  • Link all major social media profiles together to automatically update others by posting on one, saving you time
  • Besides posting your opinions and other information, continue to share and repost important pieces of content relevant to your field
  • Keep it dynamic; build a method to keep all your professional profiles of social media active and engaging

 

Staying too Long

You will often come across developers, architects, and project managers who stayed for, say, a decade or more in an organization. It’s not an issue. The problem is— most of these worked in the same projects, using the same tools, and in the same ecosystem of technology all the time. Dormancy in your career can eat away from the tree roots you want to flourish so desperately. The breakneck speed of technology space transformation makes it compulsory for people to actively start looking for new jobs within their current roles after four to five years of varied experiences.

Not only does this proactive approach keep you safe from “rightsizing” or “downsizing” it also opens hundreds of new gates for you, leading to more fulfilling (and often higher – paid) experiences.

Keep watching this space for more.

 

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